January 28, 2009

NY Times: Federal stimulus plan would provide flood of aid to education

Source: New York Times

The New York Times reports this morning with more details on the proposed federal stimulus package for education as part of the  "American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009." Additionally, estimated federal funding for your school district based on the proposal is now available in a new PDF document at our School Aid page here at nysut.org, which also includes proposed state budget allocations.

An excerpt of the Times article follows.

Stimulus Plan Would Provide Flood of Aid to Education

By SAM DILLON
Published: January 27, 2009

WASHINGTON - The economic stimulus plan that Congress has scheduled for a vote on Wednesday would shower the nation's school districts, child care centers and university campuses with $150 billion in new federal spending, a vast two-year investment that would more than double the Department of Education's current budget.

The proposed emergency expenditures on nearly every realm of education, including school renovation, special education, Head Start and grants to needy college students, would amount to the largest increase in federal aid since Washington began to spend significantly on education after World War II.

Critics and supporters alike said that by its sheer scope, the measure could profoundly change the federal government's role in education, which has traditionally been the responsibility of state and local government.

Responding in part to a plea from Democratic governors earlier this month, Congress allocated $79 billion to help states facing large fiscal shortfalls maintain government services, and especially to avoid cuts to education programs, from pre-kindergarten through higher education.

Obama administration officials, teachers unions and associations representing school boards, colleges and other institutions in American education said the aid would bring crucial financial relief to the nation's 15,000 school districts and to thousands of campuses otherwise threatened with severe cutbacks.

"This is going to avert literally hundreds of thousands of teacher layoffs," Education Secretary Arne Duncan said Tuesday.

Representative George Miller, Democrat of California and chairman of the House education committee, said, "We cannot let education collapse; we have to provide this level of support to schools."

The formulas by which the stimulus money for public schools would be allocated to states and local districts are complex, but take into consideration numbers of school-age children in poor families. The level received per student would vary considerably by state, according to an analysis by the New America Foundation, a research group that monitors education spending. New York would be among the biggest beneficiaries, at $760 per student, while New Jersey and Connecticut would fall near the bottom, with $427 and $409 per student, respectively. The District of Columbia would get the most per student, $1,289, according to the foundation’s analysis.

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