media
April 25, 2013

New York state's public high schools among nation's best in study by U.S. News

Source: NYSUT Media Relations

2013 best high schoolsALBANY, NY April 25, 2013 - New York state is home to some of the nation's best high schools - including one in Brooklyn that ranks among the nation's top 25 - according to a new report released by U.S. News & World Report.

New York ranked second - behind only California - in the number of gold-medal high schools. The publication, which collected and evaluated data on more than 21,000 public high schools in 49 states and the District of Columbia, awarded 65 gold medals to public high schools in New York. California, meanwhile, is home to 94. (Nebraska was the only state not to report data.)

The study by U.S. News comes on the heels of a nationwide report issued by the independent publication, Education Week, which ranked New York's public-education system third best in the nation behind only Maryland and Massachusetts. The U.S. News report also follows a Newsweek/The Daily Beast study released last year that found New York state was home to 10 percent of the nation's top public high schools. Ranked highest in that study was City Honors in Buffalo, which was named the 11th best public high school in the nation.

"We take immeasurable pride in the high marks achieved by New York's excellent public schools - which, should be noted, consistently rank among the nation's best year after year," said New York State United Teachers President Richard C. Iannuzzi. "While there is still work to be done, our students and teachers deserve high praise for their astounding performance, especially considering their achievements are taking place in these challenging times."

The Brooklyn Latin School, which is part of the New York City public-school system, was also ranked among the top 25 public high schools in the nation. New York's overall state rankings can be found online at USNews.com.

In compiling the report, U.S. News collaborated with the Washington D.C.-based American Institutes for Research. Schools were evaluated on: overall student performance on state-mandated assessments, and how effectively schools educated their black, Hispanic and economically disadvantaged students. Performance on Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate exams also was used to determine the degree to which schools prepare students for college-level work.

"Too many politicians, policymakers and pundits fail to appreciate the very real fact that our schools are successful," said NYSUT Vice President Maria Neira. "Independent, respected rankings such as these validate that success and give us all a reason to celebrate New York's public schools."

NYSUT, the state's largest union, represents more than 600,000 teachers, school-related professionals, academic and professional faculty in higher education, professionals in education and health care and retirees. NYSUT is affiliated with the American Federation of Teachers, National Education Association and the AFL-CIO.