January 24, 2014

"Whose Air is it Anyway?" A Grade 8 Living Environment Common Core Lesson Plan

whose air is it anyway?

TEACHER: Joe Zuniga

LESSON TITLE: Whose Air is it Anyway?

GRADE: Grade 8

SUBJECT: Living Environment

TIME FRAME: 2-3 class periods

PLANNING AND PREPARATION:

  • What rubrics will be used in the lesson?
  • Any special seating arrangement for the students? Cooperative learning groups, pairs, etc.

MATERIALS/EQUIPMENT NEEDED:

  • Smartboard
  • globes
  • student copies

LEARNING STANDARDS: include the key ideas and performance indicators (numbers for KI and PI bullet)

  • Intermediate Level Core Curriculum
    • LE 1.2d, 5.1f, 7.1e, 7.2d; PS 2.1a, 2.2n, 2.2q,2.2r
  • Common Core Learning Standards: ELA and math
    • RL.S.6-8.2,4,6,8
    • WL.S.6-8.1,2,9

LESSON MATERIALS

SHIFTS IN RELATION TO COMMON STANDARDS:

CONTENT OBJECTIVES:

Students will be able to:

  • Define and apply testable vocabulary for the Intermediate Level Science Test (ILST)
  • Use evidence from text to support their opinion
  • Use context clues to identify vocabulary

ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S):

  • This lesson reviews concepts and vocabulary for the ILST exam. In addition, students will increase their knowledge of non-science specific vocabulary. The concepts of map skills and anthropogenic influences on the environment, at both the local and global level are addressed.
  • This lesson can be used as a review for the ILST or as a lesson to introduce planetary winds.
  • Hook - Have students take a deep breath and hold it and ask: "Where has the air in your lungs been?"

ACADEMIC VOCABULARY:

DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION:

ELLS

  • Pre-teach challenging vocabulary, including vocabulary words that have different meaning in different contexts or disciplines, i.e., air supply, interesting baggage, chemical soup, fingerprint, real time, etc.
  • When pre-teaching the vocabulary, use visuals and develop anchor charts with the students' input that make the vocabulary, information and comprehension explicit.
  • For small group work, consider grouping students with language partners who speak the same home language to discuss concepts in the home language to better prepare the partners to share the concepts that they will discuss with the whole group in English.
  • Utilize a chart with the headers "How the air is used?" and "Its Effect on the air" and have students list each object and answer those two questions in relation to each object.
  • To explain the author's statements and to provide text-based evidence, model the use of thinking strategies and language frames. For example:
    When the author says ___________ , I think the author means ____________ because ____________.

SWD

Students with disabilities may be given maps to label the locations and draw arrows to show winds. This will help them transfer locations from the globe to a map.