Testing/Assessments and Learning Standards
July 31, 2015

Lesson Plan: Mr. Tiger Goes Wild

Source: Research and Educational Services

LESSON TITLE: Mr. Tiger Goes Wild

TEACHER: Kimberly Fuda

SUBJECT: Character Development

GRADE: Kindergarten

TIME FRAME: 4 Days

PLANNING AND PREPARATION:

Reading Level/Lexile: RL 1.5/AD170

  • What rubrics will be used in the lesson? Students will be able to draw a picture to represent what Mr. Tiger looked like at a given point in the story; checklist of what makes a quality illustration will be used.
  • Any special seating arrangement for the students? They will be working in pairs to find text-based evidence and to create their illustrations.  Space is needed for kinesthetic component of lesson.

LESSON MATERIALS:


RELATED LINKS:

NYS P-12 Common Core Learning Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy and Mathematics

NYSED Classroom Videos

The NYS Education Department has classroom videos available in ELA (3 elementary, 1 secondary), mathematics (2 elementary, 2 secondary), and a European history lesson. The videos are presented un-edited and formatted to highlight specific NYS Learning standards as they are implemented.

Go to EngageNY to view the videos.


MATERIALS/EQUIPMENT:

  • Multiple copies of Mr. Tiger Goes Wild
  • Drawing materials, post-it-notes to mark page in text

LESSON SUMMARY:

Summary:  Mr. Tiger grew bored with being proper all of the time.  He decided to go wild and be himself.  Mr. Tiger’s loneliness in the wilderness draws him back to town where he is happy to see some changes as all of the animals act like themselves.

What will students know or learn from this text?

Students will understand that characters can change in behavior and looks throughout a story. The illustrations and words an author includes in the text help us figure out how a characters behavior, feelings and looks change.

Where is this text taking us? What unit will it be a part of?

This text is a part of a study of character development. This lesson will encourage students to look closely at pictures and words an author or illustrator uses in a text to help their readers determine how a character is feeling or the changes a character goes through in a story. 

How will I know what they learned?

Students will verbally state what Mr. Tiger looks like, how he feels and what he is doing at a specific part of the story (Beginning, middle and end), showing their understanding of his character.  Students will also draw a picture that demonstrates their understanding of Mr. Tiger’s character and what part of the story it is from.

Enduring Understandings:

To describe a characters feelings and actions an author and illustrator uses both pictures and words.

Readers can go back to a text and look for clues that help them better understand a character.

Essential Questions:

How do I describe Mr. Tiger using the pictures and words in the story?

How can I explain to others Mr. Tiger’s character at different parts of the story?

 Student Objectives / Outcomes

Students will be able to identify characteristics of Mr. Tiger at one point in the story.

Students will use the information from the text and make their own illustration of Mr. Tiger.

Students will write their own sentence to tell about Mr. Tiger at the beginning, middle or end of the story.

 

 

NEW YORK STATE LEARNING STANDARDS:

Reading Standards for Literature

  • RL.K.1 With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text
  • RL.K.3 With prompting and support, identify characters, settings and major events in story
  • RL.K.4 Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text
  • RL.K.6 With prompting and support, name the author and illustrator of a story and define the role of each in telling
  • RL.K.7 With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear
  • RL.K.10, RI.K.10 Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding

Writing Standards

  • W.K.2 Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to narrate a single event or several loosely linked events, tell about the events in the order in which they occurred and provide a reaction to what happen.

Speaking and Listening Standards

  • SL.K.1 Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with
  • peers and adults in small and larger group requesting clarification if something is not understood.
  • SL.K.2 Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media by asking and answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if something is not understood
  • SL.K.5 Adding drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide additional detail
  • SL.K.6 Speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly

SHIFTS IN RELATION TO THE COMMON CORE STANDARDS:

This lesson incorporates all of the pedagogical shifts demanded by the Common Core State Standards

  • Balancing Informational and Literary text
  • Knowledge of the Disciplines
  • Staircase of Complexity
  • Text-based answers
  • Writing from Sources

Academic Vocabulary: Isabel Beck, Bringing Words to Life, categorizes vocabulary into 3 tiers when considering which words need the most instructional attention. Beck suggests that students will benefit the most academically by focusing instruction on the Tier 2 Vocabulary Words. Tier 2 words are likely to appear in texts across content areas, essential for understanding this text.

*TIER 2 ACADEMIC VOCABULARY:

 

High-frequency, multiple meaning vocabulary – words that appear with high frequency across a variety

of domains, and are crucial when using mature, academic language (coincidence, reluctant, analysis)

Word

Give Definition

Determine from context:

bored

free

 

proper

wild

 

lonely

wilder

 

DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION:

  • Pre-read text and discuss vocabulary
  • Provide samples of illustrations and writing for student’s reference
  • Dictate sentences for students so they can copy or trace their words to go with their illustrations

SEQUENCE OF LESSON ACTIVITIES:

Day 1:

  • Read Mr. Tiger for enjoyment and for the flow.

Day 2:

  • Use a kinesthetic approach to teaching tier 2 vocabulary words.  Reread text for the gist and allow students to act out the Tier 2 vocabulary words that were introduced. Ask Questions 1-5.

Day 3:

  • Text based questions 5-9.  Discuss character development.

Working with a partner, students will use post-it notes to mark a page in the text they choose to illustrate. Students will verbalize what Mr. Tiger is doing and how he is feeling in the illustration.

Day 4:

  • Students will write sentences to go along with their illustrations.  Sentences will include what Mr. Tiger is doing and how he is feeling at the beginning, middle or end of the text.  Students will share their work with their peers.

TEXT DEPENDENT QUESTIONS:

C= central ideas/general understanding:

  • What is this story about?
  • What is Mr. Tiger’s problem in this story?
  • Who is the stranger in the woods?

D= key details:

  • How did Mr. Tiger change from the beginning to the end of the story?
  • How do you know he changed? 
  • What did Peter Brown do to show changes in Mr. Tiger? 
  • Did the other characters change?   If so, how?
  • Why do you think they decided to change too?

V= vocabulary:

  • What does proper mean?  Look at the illustrations in the text. 
  • What do you notice Mr. Tiger and the other animals doing?

S= text structure:

  • Why do you think Peter Brown used the colors he did

       throughout this book?

(Mr. Tiger is orange and the other characters are pictured in black and white, gray)

  • What did you notice about the way the words look in this story?

 

AP= author's point of view:

  • What is Peter Brown trying to tell us in this book?

TEXT DEPENDENT QUESTIONS SEQUENCE:

(Part to whole, literal to inferential/evaluation)

  1. What is the story about? (C)
  2. What is Mr. Tiger’s problem in this story? (C)
  3. What happened at the beginning, middle, and end of the story? (C)
  4. What does proper mean?  Look at the illustrations in the text. 

What do you notice Mr. Tiger and the other animals doing? (V)

  1. Why do you think Peter Brown used the colors he did throughout this book?

(Mr. Tiger is orange and the other characters are pictured in black and white, gray)

What did you notice about the way the words look in this story? (S)

  1. How did Mr. Tiger change from the beginning to the end of the story? (D)

How do you know he changed?  (D)

  1. What did Peter Brown do to show changes in Mr. Tiger?
  2. Did the other characters change? If so, how? (D)

Why do you think they decided to change too? (D)

  1. What is Peter Brown trying to tell us in this book? (AP)

ASSESSMENT:

Formative Assessments:

  • Discussions and questioning throughout the close read lesson

Summative Assessments:

  • Students will use the information from the text and make their own illustration of Mr. Tiger.
  • Students will write their own sentence to tell about Mr. Tiger at the beginning, middle or end of the story.

REFLECTION:

Teacher reflection on the process of developing the lesson, incorporating the instructional shifts and reflecting on lesson implementation.

Process

  • What was I thinking about during the lesson writing – I wanted to make it engaging and use more of a kinesthetic approach to learning new vocabulary in the text.
  • Why I chose the lesson- I had just finished a unit on story elements and wanted to go a bit further with this and focus on character development. 
  • Struggles to make the shifts come to life- Limited materials, having to share texts added another to the lesson itself.

Implementation

  • What was the effectiveness of the instructional design- It was a positive experience.  The students were engaged with all aspects of this close read.
  • How will / did I revise the lesson?  Slow down the lesson plan; give the children more time to work on their writing and illustrations.