TAKE ACTION: Classrooms Are Heating Up!

classroom heat

Get the facts and take action against extreme classroom temperatures.

It's that time of year, and once again, classroom temperatures are rising!

When classrooms are too hot, students can't learn and teachers can't teach.

Extreme temperature isn’t just an inconvenience. As a study conducted by researchers at the University of Tulsa’s Indoor Air Program shows, it has a direct impact on student performance.

Researchers found:

  • Math test scores increased an average of 3.2% with improved classroom ventilation.
  • Math test scores rose another 2.8% when temperatures fell from a high of 78 degrees to a low of 67 degrees.

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Further studies indicate that lower classroom temperatures and improved air ventilation improve learning ability and student performance by as much as 10 to 20 percent.

Overheated schools also waste energy and cost school districts money.


TAKE ACTION!

Here are 3 ways for you to take action on extreme classroom temperatures.

1. TELL US YOUR STORY.

We’ve collected hundreds of personal stories from parents and educators about extreme classroom temperatures.

Have we heard YOURS?

Use the form below to comment on the heat in your classroom.

Your feedback helps in our ongoing efforts to address overheated workspaces and learning environments.

More stories here.

2. DOWNLOAD THE TEMPERATURE LOG AND POSTER.

These are your tools to let your school, your district and your union know what’s going on in your classroom.

classroom heat log

CLASSROOM TEMPERATURE LOG

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POSTER

 

3. CONTACT YOUR STATE REPRESENTATIVES.

Despite science, guidelines and common sense, it's all too common this time of year for classrooms across our state to be far too hot.

That’s why our union is fighting for legislation that would protect students and educators.

Take action now at the NYSUT Member Action Center to ask state lawmakers to establish an unsafe maximum room temperatures in school buildings.

The proposed law would require action to relieve heat conditions when a classroom hits 82°F and that a classroom be vacated entirely should the temperature rise to 88°F. Legislative support is crucial to keep students, educators and school employees safe!

Click here to contact your state lawmaker!



Thank you for joining the fight and taking action!





classroom heat

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